Ennerdale  Lordship Former Crown Manor - Feudal Barony of Copeland in Cumbria
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale - Feudal Barony of Copeland 2020-24

The Crown Manor

Henry I. granted the barony of Copeland to William de Meschines. This barony of Copeland lies between the rivers Duddon and Derwent and Bassenthwaite and Derwentwater Lakes, taking in part of the parish of Crosthwaite and the manors included therein, and all the other parishes and manors within the rivers and lakes. Ennerdale was the last existing portion of the feudal Barony of Copeland that was forfeited to the Crown in 1554 with the Henry Grey and Queen Lady Jane Grey estates giving Ennerdale back to the Crown. Ennerdale or Eynerdale remained a Crown Manor until it was sold with rights to Lord Lonsdale in 1821 for 2500 pounds sterling to the noble house of Baron Whitehaven/Earl Lonsdale. The manor was sold away from the Earl Lonsdale/Baron Whitehaven in the 1980’s and the Crown Manor of Ennerdale of Copeland rights were acquired by Commissioner George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief de Blondel in 2021. Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) had different names from the Saxons and Irish and was at the Conquest desmene land of Copeland in William Meschines time, but his sont Randolph Meschines gave it to the Abbey of York, and half a carucat in Egremont, or as I think but some part of Enerdale, for it was Harrington's part of the demesn of Egremont in the partition of John Multon's three co-heirs, and descended to the Boyvills, and to the Grays and Parrs Marquess of Dorset, and now to Queen Elizabeth as an escheat for want of issue of Parr. The medieval vaccary recorded in AD 1322 is described as being at the Capud de Eynerdale (head of Ennerdale), which broadly corresponds to the Gillerthwaite area within the manor. The whole of the Manor is one of the few that was owned by the 9 Day Queen Jane Grey who was England’s first lady Queen. Then, Ennerdale was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial rights to over 16,000 acres of mines, forests, mountains, and glacial lakes were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821. As a note of pedigree, in 1624, the Lordship of Ennerdale was granted by the King to his son Prince Charles - The Prince of Wales who became King in 1625 and the Crown owner and King of Ennerdale. Ennerdale and the Lake District are designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and is possibly the best place in England to view the night sky. Ennerdale is one of the largest manors in England. The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale in Cumberland were sold to Earl Lonsdale in 1821/22 and later acquired by Comm’r George Mentz, JD, MBA, OSG - Seigneur of Feif Blondel, Lord of Stoborough, Baron of Annaly-Longford, Order of St. George
£

Lear More About the Crown Manor

The Ennerdale Crown Manor & Lordship was Sold directly by the Crown with full rights to the Earl of Lonsdale in 1822 The Territory below with Pink Border is the Ennerdale Lordship that includes mountains, rivers, lakes and mines. The Seigneur of Fief Blondel, George Mentz, Esq. is the present Lord of Ennerdale Manor and Forest
Coat of Arms of Copeland
Kingdom of Strathclyde
Ennerdale Manor
There are many Fells or Mountains in or surrounding Ennedale Valley including Kirk, Haycock, Caw, Lank Rigg, Grike, Great Borne, Red Pike, High Stile, The Pillar, Scoat Fell, Ennerdale Fell, and Great Gable. Wainwrights are the 214 English peaks (known locally as fells) described in Alfred Wainwright's seven-volume Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells (1955–66). Grike is a hill in the west of the English Lake District, near Ennerdale Water. It is part of the Lank Rigg group, the most westerly Wainwright as the fells diminish toward the coastal plain. It can be climbed from Kinniside or Ennerdale Bridge.

Ennerdale Manor and Forest

Board of Trustees of the Feudal Barony of Copeland - Crown Manor of Ennerdale or Eynerdale - Est. 1338 The Board of Trustees for the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a revered national treasure, operates under the guidance of George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief Blondel. This board is profoundly committed to the protection and sustainable management of the Manor's extensive natural landscapes, which include mountains, lakes, rivers, crags, waterfalls, and expansive forests. Nature and Functions of the Trustees of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale: 1. Environmental Conservation: The trustees prioritize the ecological integrity of the Manor’s diverse ecosystems. Their stewardship includes initiatives to raise awareness to preserve the pristine condition of the lakes and rivers, prevent erosion in the mountains and crags, and protect the old-growth forests from deforestation or unsustainable practices. 2. Cultural and Historical Preservation: They manage historical sites within the estate with a commitment to preserving and interpreting the Manor’s rich past for educational and cultural enrichment. This includes safeguarding archaeological sites and ensuring that any interventions in the landscape respect its historical significance. 3. Public Access and Education: The trustees facilitate public access to the estate's natural wonders through well-maintained trails and informational signage, promoting an understanding of the ecological and historical value of the area. They organize educational programs that focus on the importance of conservation and the specific environmental features of the Manor. 4. Sustainable Development and Community Involvement: Balancing ecological preservation with local community needs, the trustees oversee sustainable tourism initiatives that enhance economic benefits while maintaining environmental health. They engage local communities in conservation efforts, fostering a sense of ownership and responsibility towards the land. Historical Context: The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale's designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site underscores its global significance, both environmentally and culturally. The estate has been a focal point of human-nature interaction, where conservation practices are deeply intertwined with the area’s historical narrative. Heritage and Cultural Attributes: The landscape is noted for its breathtaking beauty—rugged mountains, tranquil lakes, flowing rivers, dramatic crags, cascading waterfalls, and lush forestry all contribute to a spectacular natural tapestry. These elements are not only visually stunning but also serve as habitats for diverse wildlife, making their conservation a priority. Modern Implications and Preservation: Under the leadership of George Mentz, the trustees are deeply invested in protecting these natural features against the threats of climate-pollution, over-tourism, and ecological degradation. Their management strategies are designed to be forward- thinking and adaptive, ensuring that the Manor’s landscapes can be enjoyed by future generations while retaining their ecological functions and historical significance. Strategic Vision and Governance: The governance of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale by the Board of Trustees is characterized by a commitment to transparency, environmental stewardship, and active engagement with global conservation networks. Their efforts ensure that the Manor remains a model of sustainable management and a sanctuary for both nature lovers and cultural enthusiasts. In summary, the stewardship by the Board of Trustees, under the esteemed leadership of George Mentz, JD, MBA, CWM, OSG, Seigneur of Fief Blondel, encapsulates a profound dedication to preserving the natural and cultural heritage of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale. Their vigilant protection of the mountains, lakes, rivers, crags, waterfalls, and forests ensures that this unique landscape continues to inspire and educate, remaining a vital part of the world's heritage. Link to Wild Ennerdale PDF Maps Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Part of the Copeland Barony called Ennerdale or Eghnerdale (was never reunited with the rest of the barony and was forfeited to the Crown in 1554). After almost 450 years, rights to the Crown Manor of Ennerdale were acquired by the Counselor George Mentz, Esq., Seigneur of the Fief Blondel. Ennerdale - Copeland, Cumbria History In ancient history, Cumbria changed hands between the Angles, Norse (Norwegians, Danes and Hiberno-Norse), Strathclyde Brythons, Picts, Normans, Scots and English; up until the emergence of the modern county today. After the Romans departed, Ennerdale Copeland became part of the Kingdom of Rheged of Cumbria (Years 550-650) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd ("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England and southern Scotland, during the post-Roman era and Early Middle Ages. Ennerdale Copeland then became part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde (lit. "Strath of the River Clyde") also called the Kingdom of Cumbria. After the sack of Dumbarton Rock by a Viking army from Dublin in 870, the name Strathclyde came into use, perhaps reflecting a move of the centre of the kingdom to Govan. In the same period, it was also referred to as Cumbria, and its inhabitants as Cumbrians. During the High Middle Ages, the area was conquered by the Goidelic-speaking Kingdom of Alba in the 11th century, becoming part of the new Kingdom of Scotland. The language of Strathclyde, and that of the Britons in surrounding areas under non-native rulership, is known as Cumbric. The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, c. 600–875, and then, the Vikings, Strathclyde Brythons, Scots controlled the region from 875–1066. David I of Scotland, who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113–1124). In 1237, the Treaty of York was signed, by which Alexander renounced claims to Northumberland, Cumberland and Westmorland, while Henry granted the Scottish king certain lands in the north, including manors in Cumberland. In the Early Middle Ages, Cumbria was part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde in the Hen Ogledd, or "Old North", and its people spoke a Brittonic language now called Cumbric. Yr Hen Ogledd, in English the Old North, is the historical region of Northern England and the southern Scottish Lowlands inhabited by the Celtic Britons of sub-Roman Britain in the Early Middle Ages. Its population spoke a variety of the Brittonic language known as Cumbric. In the end, the Cumbrian region became part of England and the British Empire.

The Ennerdale Manor

The manor contains about 17,000 acres. The area of the township is 17,782 acres. Whitehaven receives its water supply from Ennerdale. Ennerdale Forest is about 7,500 acres. Ennerdale water LAKE is about 1,000 acres large. There are mountains, lakes rivers and waterfalls and hostels on the manor. The waste lands of the manor of Ennerdale in the township of Ennerdale contain a massive 11,000 acres. There was also a Lease of this Manor to the National Trust in 1961; although this was for a term of 35 years which expired in 1996. The deed of Lordship Conveyance says, The Ennerdale Manor was conveyed with “ all corporeal and incorporeal hereditaments appurtenant thereto”.
Ennerdale Manor has had an illustrious history of officers for this Lordship such as: 1. Bailiff 2. Steward 3. Forester of Ennerdale 4. Bow Bearer 5. Game Warden 6. Keeper of the Courts 7. Conductor of Tenants 8. Bard of Ennerdale The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale is one of the largest Manors in England with it’s vast 11,000 acres of Manorial Waste which includes mountains, viking ruins, rivers, waterfalls, lakes, hiking, forests, trees, and other non- inhabited lands which are not common land. The Manorial Waste of Ennerdale is roughly the size of Manhattan New York. Ennerdale is a UNESCO Recognized World Heritage Site Ennerdale Forest and Manor and the Lake District National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage site, putting it alongside the likes of the Taj Mahal, Machu Piccu and the Grand Canyon.

Ennerdale Manor and Forest

Board of Trustees of the Feudal Barony of Copeland - Crown Manor of Ennerdale or Eynerdale - Est. 1338 The Board of Trustees for the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a revered national treasure, operates under the guidance of George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief Blondel. This board is profoundly committed to the protection and sustainable management of the Manor's extensive natural landscapes, which include mountains, lakes, rivers, crags, waterfalls, and expansive forests. Nature and Functions of the Trustees of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale: 1. Environmental Conservation: The trustees prioritize the ecological integrity of the Manor’s diverse ecosystems. Their stewardship includes initiatives to raise awareness to preserve the pristine condition of the lakes and rivers, prevent erosion in the mountains and crags, and protect the old-growth forests from deforestation or unsustainable practices. 2. Cultural and Historical Preservation: They manage historical sites within the estate with a commitment to preserving and interpreting the Manor’s rich past for educational and cultural enrichment. This includes safeguarding archaeological sites and ensuring that any interventions in the landscape respect its historical significance. 3. Public Access and Education: The trustees facilitate public access to the estate's natural wonders through well-maintained trails and informational signage, promoting an understanding of the ecological and historical value of the area. They organize educational programs that focus on the importance of conservation and the specific environmental features of the Manor. 4. Sustainable Development and Community Involvement: Balancing ecological preservation with local community needs, the trustees oversee sustainable tourism initiatives that enhance economic benefits while maintaining environmental health. They engage local communities in conservation efforts, fostering a sense of ownership and responsibility towards the land. Historical Context: The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale's designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site underscores its global significance, both environmentally and culturally. The estate has been a focal point of human-nature interaction, where conservation practices are deeply intertwined with the area’s historical narrative. Heritage and Cultural Attributes: The landscape is noted for its breathtaking beauty—rugged mountains, tranquil lakes, flowing rivers, dramatic crags, cascading waterfalls, and lush forestry all contribute to a spectacular natural tapestry. These elements are not only visually stunning but also serve as habitats for diverse wildlife, making their conservation a priority. Modern Implications and Preservation: Under the leadership of George Mentz, the trustees are deeply invested in protecting these natural features against the threats of climate-pollution, over-tourism, and ecological degradation. Their management strategies are designed to be forward- thinking and adaptive, ensuring that the Manor’s landscapes can be enjoyed by future generations while retaining their ecological functions and historical significance. Strategic Vision and Governance: The governance of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale by the Board of Trustees is characterized by a commitment to transparency, environmental stewardship, and active engagement with global conservation networks. Their efforts ensure that the Manor remains a model of sustainable management and a sanctuary for both nature lovers and cultural enthusiasts. In summary, the stewardship by the Board of Trustees, under the esteemed leadership of George Mentz, JD, MBA, CWM, OSG, Seigneur of Fief Blondel, encapsulates a profound dedication to preserving the natural and cultural heritage of the Manor and Forest of Ennerdale. Their vigilant protection of the mountains, lakes, rivers, crags, waterfalls, and forests ensures that this unique landscape continues to inspire and educate, remaining a vital part of the world's heritage. Link to Wild Ennerdale PDF Maps Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Part of the Copeland Barony called Ennerdale or Eghnerdale (was never reunited with the rest of the barony and was forfeited to the Crown in 1554). After almost 450 years, rights to the Crown Manor of Ennerdale were acquired by the Counselor George Mentz, Esq., Seigneur of the Fief Blondel. Ennerdale - Copeland, Cumbria History In ancient history, Cumbria changed hands between the Angles, Norse (Norwegians, Danes and Hiberno- Norse), Strathclyde Brythons, Picts, Normans, Scots and English; up until the emergence of the modern county today. After the Romans departed, Ennerdale Copeland became part of the Kingdom of Rheged of Cumbria (Years 550-650) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd ("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England and southern Scotland, during the post- Roman era and Early Middle Ages. Ennerdale Copeland then became part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde (lit. "Strath of the River Clyde") also called the Kingdom of Cumbria. After the sack of Dumbarton Rock by a Viking army from Dublin in 870, the name Strathclyde came into use, perhaps reflecting a move of the centre of the kingdom to Govan. In the same period, it was also referred to as Cumbria, and its inhabitants as Cumbrians. During the High Middle Ages, the area was conquered by the Goidelic-speaking Kingdom of Alba in the 11th century, becoming part of the new Kingdom of Scotland. The language of Strathclyde, and that of the Britons in surrounding areas under non-native rulership, is known as Cumbric. The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, c. 600–875, and then, the Vikings, Strathclyde Brythons, Scots controlled the region from 875–1066. David I of Scotland, who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113–1124). In 1237, the Treaty of York was signed, by which Alexander renounced claims to Northumberland, Cumberland and Westmorland, while Henry granted the Scottish king certain lands in the north, including manors in Cumberland. In the Early Middle Ages, Cumbria was part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde in the Hen Ogledd, or "Old North", and its people spoke a Brittonic language now called Cumbric. Yr Hen Ogledd, in English the Old North, is the historical region of Northern England and the southern Scottish Lowlands inhabited by the Celtic Britons of sub-Roman Britain in the Early Middle Ages. Its population spoke a variety of the Brittonic language known as Cumbric. In the end, the Cumbrian region became part of England and the British Empire.
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale Feudal Barony of Copeland

The Crown Manor

Henry I. granted the barony of Copeland to William de Meschines. This barony of Copeland lies between the rivers Duddon and Derwent and Bassenthwaite and Derwentwater Lakes, taking in part of the parish of Crosthwaite and the manors included therein, and all the other parishes and manors within the rivers and lakes. Ennerdale was the last existing portion of the feudal Barony of Copeland that was forfeited to the Crown in 1554 with the Henry Grey and Queen Lady Jane Grey estates giving Ennerdale back to the Crown. Ennerdale or Eynerdale remained a Crown Manor until it was sold with rights to Lord Lonsdale in 1821 for 2500 pounds sterling to the noble house of Baron Whitehaven/Earl Lonsdale. The manor was sold away from the Earl Lonsdale/Baron Whitehaven in the 1980’s and the Crown Manor of Ennerdale of Copeland rights were acquired by Commissioner George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief de Blondel in 2021. Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) had different names from the Saxons and Irish and was at the Conquest desmene land of Copeland in William Meschines time, but his sont Randolph Meschines gave it to the Abbey of York, and half a carucat in Egremont, or as I think but some part of Enerdale, for it was Harrington's part of the demesn of Egremont in the partition of John Multon's three co-heirs, and descended to the Boyvills, and to the Grays and Parrs Marquess of Dorset, and now to Queen Elizabeth as an escheat for want of issue of Parr. The medieval vaccary recorded in AD 1322 is described as being at the Capud de Eynerdale (head of Ennerdale), which broadly corresponds to the Gillerthwaite area within the manor. The whole of the Manor is one of the few that was owned by the 9 Day Queen Jane Grey who was England’s first lady Queen. Then, Ennerdale was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial rights to over 16,000 acres of mines, forests, mountains, and glacial lakes were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821. As a note of pedigree, in 1624, the Lordship of Ennerdale was granted by the King to his son Prince Charles - The Prince of Wales who became King in 1625 and the Crown owner and King of Ennerdale. Ennerdale and the Lake District are designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and is possibly the best place in England to view the night sky. Ennerdale is one of the largest manors in England. The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale in Cumberland were sold to Earl Lonsdale in 1821/22 and later acquired by Comm’r George Mentz, JD, MBA, OSG - Seigneur of Feif Blondel, Lord of Stoborough, Baron of Annaly-Longford, Order of St. George
£

Lear More About the Crown Manor

The Ennerdale Crown Manor & Lordship was Sold directly by the Crown with full rights to the Earl of Lonsdale in 1822 The Territory below with Pink Border is the Ennerdale Lordship that includes mountains, rivers, lakes and mines. The Seigneur of Fief Blondel, George Mentz, Esq. is the present Lord of Ennerdale Manor and Forest
Ennerdale Manor has had an illustrious history of officers for this Lordship such as: 1. Bailiff 2. Steward 3. Forester of Ennerdale 4. Bow Bearer 5. Game Warden 6. Keeper of the Courts 7. Conductor of Tenants The Manor and Forest of Ennerdale is one of the largest Manors in England with it’s vast 11,000 acres of Manorial Waste which includes mountains, viking ruins, rivers, waterfalls, lakes, hiking, forests, trees, and other non-inhabited lands which are not common land. The Manorial Waste of Ennerdale is roughly the size of Manhattan New York.
Ennerdale is a UNESCO Recognized World Heritage Site Ennerdale Forest and Manor and the Lake District National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage site, putting it alongside the likes of the Taj Mahal, Machu Piccu and the Grand Canyon.