Ennerdale  Lordship Former Crown Manor - Feudal Barony of Copeland in Cumbria
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale - 2020-22

The Crown Manor

Henry I. granted the barony of Copeland to William de Meschines. This barony of Copeland lies between the rivers Duddon and Derwent and Bassenthwaite and Derwentwater Lakes, taking in part of the parish of Crosthwaite and the manors included therein, and all the other parishes and manors within the rivers and lakes. Ennerdale was the last existing portion of the feudal Barony of Copeland that was forfeited to the Crown in 1554. Ennerdale or Eynerdale remained a Crown Manor until it was sold with rights to Lord Lonsdale in 1821 for 2500 pounds sterling to the noble house of Baron Whitehaven/Earl Lonsdale. The manor was sold away from the Earl Lonsdale/Baron Whitehaven in the 1980’s and the Crown Manor of Ennerdale of Copeland was purchased by the Commissioner George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief de Blondel in 2021. Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) sallis ad Eyn, both the town and parish now called by the inhabitants. The Irish named it Lough- Eanheh Lacus volucrum, of the fowls that bred there in the islands; and the river Oonh- Eanheh and the dale Eanor or Ar-ean. The Saxons still retaining the Irish name called the bottom and valley Enerdale. It was at the Conquest desmene land of Copeland in William Meschines time, but his sont Randolph Meschines gave it to the Abbey of York, and half a carucat in Egremont, or as I think but some part of Enerdale, for it was Harrington's part of the demesn of Egremont in the partition of John Multon's three co- heirs, and descended to the Boyvills, and to the Grays and Parrs Marquess of Dorset, and now to Queen Elizabeth as an escheat for want of issue of Parr. The medieval vaccary recorded in AD 1322 is described as being at the Capud de Eynerdale (head of Ennerdale), which broadly corresponds to the Gillerthwaite area within the manor.
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Lear More About the Crown Manor

The Enndale Crown Manor & Lordship was Sold by the Crown with full rights to the Earl of Lonsdale in 1822 for 2500 pounds. The Territory below with Pink Border is the Ennerdale Lordship that includes mountains, rivers, lakes and mines.
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Coat of Arms of Copeland

Cumbria Coat of Arms

Kingdom of Strathclyde
Ennerdale Manor

Welcome from The Lords

of Ennerdale

Ancient Crown Manor of Eynerdale, Cumbria

Feudal Barony of Copeland - Crown Manor of Eynerdale or Eghnerdale - Est. 1338 Around 1120, Henry I gave the Barony of Copeland to Ranulph le Meschines son William who made his home at Egremont and began to build the castle, which took approximately 150 years to complete. The upland section of the barony of Copeland or Egremont covered the western valleys of the Lake District. The family de Multon’s inherited the Barony though marriage to le Mechines female descendants. The Copeland forest was partitioned into three parts in 1338 after the death of John de Multon. The Copeland area was under the rule of Scottish and English Kings for centuries until the September 25, 1237 Signing of the Treaty of York. Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Crown Manor of Eynerdale, or rather a portion of it, was given by Ranulph, son of William de Meschines, to the priory of St. Bees; the other portion of Ancient Copeland/ Eynerdale passed hands in the division of the barony of Egremont to the Harringtons of Harrington, from them came by successive heiresses to the Boyvilles and Greys, and was ultimately forfeited to the Crown, in 1554, by the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk. The whole of the Manor was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial court rights were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821. Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Part of the Copeland Barony called Ennerdale or Eghnerdale (was never reunited with the rest of the barony and was forfeited to the Crown in 1554). After almost 450 years, rights to the Crown Manor of Ennerdale were acquired by the Counselor George Mentz, Esq., Seigneur of the Fief Blondel. Ennerdale - Copeland, Cumbria History Cumbria changed hands between the Angles, Norse (Norwegians, Danes and Hiberno-Norse), Strathclyde Brythons, Picts, Normans, Scots and English; up until the emergence of the modern county today. After the Romans departed, Ennerdale Copeland became part of the Kingdom of Rheged of Cumbria (Years 550-650) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd ("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England and southern Scotland, during the post-Roman era and Early Middle Ages. Ennerdale Copeland then became part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde (lit. "Strath of the River Clyde") also called the Kingdom of Cumbria. After the sack of Dumbarton Rock by a Viking army from Dublin in 870, the name Strathclyde came into use, perhaps reflecting a move of the centre of the kingdom to Govan. In the same period, it was also referred to as Cumbria, and its inhabitants as Cumbrians. During the High Middle Ages, the area was conquered by the Goidelic-speaking Kingdom of Alba in the 11th century, becoming part of the new Kingdom of Scotland. The language of Strathclyde, and that of the Britons in surrounding areas under non-native rulership, is known as Cumbric. The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, c. 600–875, and then, the Vikings, Strathclyde Brythons, Scots controlled the region from 875–1066. David I of Scotland, who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113–1124). In 1237, the Treaty of York was signed, by which Alexander renounced claims to Northumberland, Cumberland and Westmorland, while Henry granted the Scottish king certain lands in the north, including manors in Cumberland. In the Early Middle Ages, Cumbria was part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde in the Hen Ogledd, or "Old North", and its people spoke a Brittonic language now called Cumbric. Yr Hen Ogledd, in English the Old North, is the historical region of Northern England and the southern Scottish Lowlands inhabited by the Celtic Britons of sub-Roman Britain in the Early Middle Ages. Its population spoke a variety of the Brittonic language known as Cumbric. In the end, the Cumbrian region became part of England and the British Empire.

Welcome from The

Lords of Ennerdale

Ancient Crown Manor of Eynerdale,

Cumbria

Feudal Barony of Copeland - Crown Manor of Eynerdale or Eghnerdale - Est. 1338 Around 1120, Henry I gave the Barony of Copeland to Ranulph le Meschines son William who made his home at Egremont and began to build the castle, which took approximately 150 years to complete. The upland section of the barony of Copeland or Egremont covered the western valleys of the Lake District. The family de Multon’s inherited the Barony though marriage to le Mechines female descendants. The Copeland forest was partitioned into three parts in 1338 after the death of John de Multon. The Copeland area was under the rule of Scottish and English Kings for centuries until the September 25, 1237 Signing of the Treaty of York. Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Crown Manor of Eynerdale, or rather a portion of it, was given by Ranulph, son of William de Meschines, to the priory of St. Bees; the other portion of Ancient Copeland/ Eynerdale passed hands in the division of the barony of Egremont to the Harringtons of Harrington, from them came by successive heiresses to the Boyvilles and Greys, and was ultimately forfeited to the Crown, in 1554, by the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk. The whole of the Manor was held by the Crown from 1554-1821 and all of the manorial and baronial court rights were purchased by the Earl of Lonsdale in 1821. Most of modern-day Cumbria was a principality in the Kingdom of Scotland at the time of the Norman conquest of England in 1066 and thus was excluded from the Domesday Book survey of 1086. The Part of the Copeland Barony called Ennerdale or Eghnerdale (was never reunited with the rest of the barony and was forfeited to the Crown in 1554). After almost 450 years, rights to the Crown Manor of Ennerdale were acquired by the Counselor George Mentz, Esq., Seigneur of the Fief Blondel. Ennerdale - Copeland, Cumbria History Cumbria changed hands between the Angles, Norse (Norwegians, Danes and Hiberno-Norse), Strathclyde Brythons, Picts, Normans, Scots and English; up until the emergence of the modern county today. After the Romans departed, Ennerdale Copeland became part of the Kingdom of Rheged of Cumbria (Years 550-650) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd ("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England and southern Scotland, during the post- Roman era and Early Middle Ages. Ennerdale Copeland then became part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde (lit. "Strath of the River Clyde") also called the Kingdom of Cumbria. After the sack of Dumbarton Rock by a Viking army from Dublin in 870, the name Strathclyde came into use, perhaps reflecting a move of the centre of the kingdom to Govan. In the same period, it was also referred to as Cumbria, and its inhabitants as Cumbrians. During the High Middle Ages, the area was conquered by the Goidelic-speaking Kingdom of Alba in the 11th century, becoming part of the new Kingdom of Scotland. The language of Strathclyde, and that of the Britons in surrounding areas under non-native rulership, is known as Cumbric. The Angles: Northumbrian takeover and rule, c. 600–875, and then, the Vikings, Strathclyde Brythons, Scots controlled the region from 875–1066. David I of Scotland, who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113–1124). In 1237, the Treaty of York was signed, by which Alexander renounced claims to Northumberland, Cumberland and Westmorland, while Henry granted the Scottish king certain lands in the north, including manors in Cumberland. In the Early Middle Ages, Cumbria was part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde in the Hen Ogledd, or "Old North", and its people spoke a Brittonic language now called Cumbric. Yr Hen Ogledd, in English the Old North, is the historical region of Northern England and the southern Scottish Lowlands inhabited by the Celtic Britons of sub-Roman Britain in the Early Middle Ages. Its population spoke a variety of the Brittonic language known as Cumbric. In the end, the Cumbrian region became part of England and the British Empire.
© Former Crown Manor of Ennerdale Former Barony of Copeland

The Crown Manor

Henry I. granted the barony of Copeland to William de Meschines. This barony of Copeland lies between the rivers Duddon and Derwent and Bassenthwaite and Derwentwater Lakes, taking in part of the parish of Crosthwaite and the manors included therein, and all the other parishes and manors within the rivers and lakes. Ennerdale was the last existing portion of the feudal Barony of Copeland that was forfeited to the Crown in 1554. Ennerdale or Eynerdale remained a Crown Manor until it was sold with rights to Lord Lonsdale in 1821 for 2500 pounds sterling to the noble house of Baron Whitehaven/Earl Lonsdale. The manor was sold away from the Earl Lonsdale/Baron Whitehaven in the 1980’s and the Crown Manor of Ennerdale of Copeland was purchased by the Commissioner George Mentz, Seigneur of Fief de Blondel in 2021. Ennerdale (Alnanderdale or Eynerdale) sallis ad Eyn, both the town and parish now called by the inhabitants. The Irish named it Lough- Eanheh Lacus volucrum, of the fowls that bred there in the islands; and the river Oonh- Eanheh and the dale Eanor or Ar-ean. The Saxons still retaining the Irish name called the bottom and valley Enerdale. It was at the Conquest desmene land of Copeland in William Meschines time, but his sont Randolph Meschines gave it to the Abbey of York, and half a carucat in Egremont, or as I think but some part of Enerdale, for it was Harrington's part of the demesn of Egremont in the partition of John Multon's three co- heirs, and descended to the Boyvills, and to the Grays and Parrs Marquess of Dorset, and now to Queen Elizabeth as an escheat for want of issue of Parr. The medieval vaccary recorded in AD 1322 is described as being at the Capud de Eynerdale (head of Ennerdale), which broadly corresponds to the Gillerthwaite area within the manor.
£

Lear More About the Crown Manor

The Enndale Crown Manor & Lordship was Sold by the Crown with full rights to the Earl of Lonsdale in 1822 for 2500 pounds. The Territory below with Pink Border is the Ennerdale Lordship that includes mountains, rivers, lakes and mines.
£